March: Book One by John Lewis

March (Book One) - Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell, John Robert Lewis

Lately, I've been trying to educate myself in areas of life where my knowledge is sorely lacking. A part of that lacking is how the Civil Rights Movement came about. Then, recently, I learned about Congressman John Lewis and his role in the Civil Rights Movement. When I heard about this graphic novel, I went to my library and placed orders for all three volumes. Now, after having read just the first volume, I can tell this is going to be one of the most important reads of my life.

 

How does one even begin to review a book like this? This is our history. This is extremely important information to know. Not only if you live in America, but for the world. What John Lewis and so many others did to help put an end (and there's still a lot more we have to do in order to fully put an end to racism and discrimination of any kind) to the injustices that were happening during that time period is astounding and is worth more than what my measly review can cover here.

 

So instead of reviewing this book like I would normally do, I will simply talk about the importance this graphic novel holds and how much I urge you to pick up this book. Or to pick up any book by John Lewis, really. 

 

This graphic novel covers the beginning of John Lewis's life where he grew up in a farm in Alabama and it covers his early teens to when he's a young adult at college. The story is harrowing, to say the least. This is a time where black people were beaten and killed for just looking at a white person... so you know this is going to be a hard read. But it is a necessary one. So please. Read this book. To educate yourself on our history. To learn from the brutal and cruel mistakes of our past. To have a better future.

 

This is not a book I think is an enjoyable read. How can you enjoy reading about people being stripped away of their rights and humanity? No. I will say this is an important read and, in a sense, a good one. Pick it up! The artwork is dark and matches the story perfectly, and the graphic novel might give some insight to how we got to where we are today and how we still have so much work left to do. I highly recommend this graphic novel.

 

I'm off to read the other two books in this trilogy. I have a feeling it's going to be just as painful and important to read.