The Mothers by Brit Bennett

The Mothers: A Novel - Brit Bennett

This book has been going around quite a bit and I became very curious about what The Mothers had to say. So I went to the library, my second home, and picked up a copy. And I must say, it's a pretty good read.

 

The book starts off with Nadia, a seventeen-year-old girl, who just lost her mother to suicide. Grieving, she later becomes involved with the pastor's son, Luke, and they have a secret relationship that results in Nadia becoming pregnant. She goes through many ups and downs whilst trying to figure out what she wants in life. Aubrey, a friend Nadia meets at the town's local church, becomes heavily involves in both Nadia and Luke's lives and all three are shown throughout the novel growing into adulthood whilst trying to discover who they are as people.

 

I really liked this story. The writing was quite beautiful and I enjoyed the way Bennett told the story. Part of the story is told by this elderly group called The Mothers. They are an older generation of women who are at the community church and tell the story from an outsider's perspective, reminiscent to the Greek chorus. I love that writing style and Bennett did an excellent job in using it to engage the reader into her story about these character.

 

Speaking of characters, they are extremely flawed. I don't really think there's any redeemable qualities in any of them. Nadia becomes so grief stricken after losing her mother that she becomes reckless. Reckless to the point she is willing to hurt her father, who is going through his own grieving process, and her best friend. Luke... I don't like Luke. I didn't understand why Nadia was so hung up over him. After he treats he horribly throughout the entire book. He mostly wanted to have sex with her and that's it. Aubrey is the character I like most in this book. She goes through her own problems and have a strained relationship with her mother. The only solace she found being the church. I'm not religious myself so it was interesting seeing how this character was able to embrace her faith enough to comfort her but not obsess over it (as I've seen other characters do in other books). I enjoyed seeing her grow and transform into the woman she became.

 

There's a certain incident that happens later in the book that I cannot talk about in great detail because it's quite a huge spoiler. However, I will say that incident really didn't sit well with me. I know things like that happen all the time in real life and it's not that I have a problem with. I will say the incident is cheating. I don't like when anyone cheats. If you are in a committed relationship with someone, you do NOT cheat. It's wrong. If there's consent between both parties to involve someone else, then that's fine, Polyamorous relationships deserve as much respect as monoamorous ones. However, this was cheating through and through. And THAT is wrong.

 

But don't get me wrong. The cheating itself is not what bugs me. Like I said, it happens all the time. It's how it's dealt with that doesn't sit right with me. It wrapped up too nicely. Everything was just handle too simply. Too cleanly. I know people shouldn't hold grudges and that you should learn to forgive and let go. But for everything to be completely forgiven in the end? There really wasn't any consequences to be had. For something like that to be forgiven and forgotten seemed too unrealistic to me.

 

This is in no way to say that I didn't like the book. I did. Personally, I just felt the ending was wrapped up too quickly for me to fully immerse myself in the narrative. 

 

If you like stories about friendship, community, loss, and faith then you should definitely give this book a try. A bit of a warning though, there's talk of suicide, sexual assault, and rape so keep that in mind if those are things you rather stay clear of. Otherwise, this is a pretty good book about what it's like to live in a small Christian community and how that can influence people therein.